Monday, October 28, 2013

The mysterious case of a stolen bridge

Thieves who stole a 17.5m long stone bridge one night have finally been arrested, although they sold the bridge on before it could be recovered.

In November, villagers in the environs of Shanghai reported that the Fengle bridge, a historic 17.5m long stone bridge built in 1907, had disappeared, leaving only two supports standing.

Police eventually solved the mystery when they received a report from someone who had witnessed them dismantling the bridge in September, and had taken down their truck’s registration details.

After tracing the truck’s owner, they were told it had been loaned to the thieves, allowing police to effect the arrest of the two men responsible.

The local police chief says they admit making off with the bridge by cover of night:

“The two men confessed that they used two cranes and two trucks that night to lift and remove the 16 stone pieces that formed the floor of the bridge.”

The stone remains of the bridge were subsequently sold in another province, with the thieves having been paid some 30,000 yuan ($4,700) by a trader to make off with the structure.

A local museum official comments that the area only has 20 bridges left, of the 100 counted a century ago – roads, ruin and theft are cited as causes of this decline. Plans are afoot to rebuild the stolen structure.

While in China...... beware of crumbling bridge


Sunday, October 6, 2013

Clever China: How to keep those 2 million fresh graduates from becoming unemployed

China is employing two million people to keep tabs on people's internet use, according to state media, in a rare glimpse into the secret world of Beijing's vast online surveillance operation.

Many of the employees are simply performing keyword searches to monitor the tens of millions of messages being posted daily on popular social media and microblogging sites, the Beijing News said.

The exact number of people employed to trawl through the internet in a bid to prevent social unrest and limit criticism of the ruling Community party has long been the subject of speculation.

The "web police" are employed by the government's propaganda arm, as well as by commercial sites, the Beijing News said.

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Nose grown on forehead


A Chinese man has had a new nose grown on his forehead.

The man, who has only been named as Xiaolian, had the treatment to create a replacement for his original nose which was infected and deformed after an accident.k

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Hahaha... clever Chinese are not only cloning iPhones, they now clone dogs to become lions


A Henan province zoo was found to keep a Tibetan dog in a lion cage and cleverly labelled it as a lion.

The fake lion was discovered when a mother took her child to and was surprised to hear the lion barking.

The zoo’s explanation was that an employee’s dog had temporarily replaced the lion sent away
” to a breeding centre, because of unspecified “safety concerns.”

Cockroach revenge

A Chinese farm breeding cockroaches to make into medicines has released a million of its charges into the local neigbhbourhood after being attacked as part of a development land grab.

According to the Chinese media, a Jiangsu province facility breeding cockroaches for “medicinal” purposes has been at the centre of a (by Chinese standards) minor public health scandal after its livestock escaped en masse.



The greenhouse housing the roaches was reportedly destroyed by persons unknown, letting approximately 1 million of the insects escape.

Local authorities have begun attempting to exterminate the escapees, and insists to the p “there is no reason for people to panic.”

There is some suspicion officials themselves destroyed the farm as part of a China style property development deal, but the local government assures the public that “we didn’t do it.”

Just what medicines the cockroaches were being used to produce is not known.